Windy City Media Group Frontpage News

THE VOICE OF CHICAGO'S GAY, LESBIAN, BI, TRANS AND QUEER COMMUNITY SINCE 1985

home search facebook twitter join
Gay News Sponsor Windy City Times 2021-09-01
DOWNLOAD ISSUE
Donate

Sponsor
Sponsor

  WINDY CITY TIMES

BOOKS Partner violence among LGBTQs presents unique challenges
by Bronson Pettitt
2017-03-29

This article shared 1231 times since Wed Mar 29, 2017
facebook twitter pin it google +1 reddit email


In new book, Chicago author dispels myths and finds intimate partner violence is more prevalent than believed

Many LGBTQ people experience some form of violence from their partners at some point, but this often goes unreported and even unnoticed.

In fact, more than 43 percent of lesbian women and 26 percent of gay men in the U.S. have experienced some type of physical intimate partner violence, or IPV, according to sources cited in Dr. Adam Messinger's new book, LGBTQ Intimate Partner Violence: Lessons for Policy, Practice, and Research, published by the University of California Press.

The prevalence rate for physical IPV among bisexual women and men is upwards of 60 percent and 37 percent, respectively, while trans* people reported up to 46 percent, writes Messinger, a professor at Northeastern Illinois University.

In all instances, physical IPV rates were higher for LGBTQ people than for heterosexual cisgender couples, according to the book. The same is true for other types of violence, including psychological violence.

Messinger reviewed more than 600 research publications from various disciplines spanning six continents and four decades of research, in what he says is a comprehensive approach to LGBTQ IPV research.

"Every article I'd read on LGBTQ IPV would begin with the statement, 'there's not a lot of research on this.' And after writing the book I can say, 'that's not entirely true.' There's quite a bit,'" Messinger told Windy City Times.

Rather, LGBTQ IPV research exists but it is segmented by sexual minority and academic discipline, dispersed among scores of hard-to-access databases, Messinger found.

"My hope is that the book raises the national public profile of LGBTQ IPV. It's a real, serious problem," he said.

Myths and barriers

Several myths surround LGBTQ IPV: that it is rare or less severe than violence in heterosexual relationships. There is an assumption that LGBTQ people are inherently nonviolent, especially sexual minority women, according to Messinger.

But this stereotype can prevent "lesbian female victims' ability to recognize that a partner's behavior is in fact abusive rather than normal," Messinger writes.

Similarly, in male same-gender relationships, men are stereotypically viewed to be of similar physical strength and able to "hold their own."

"Men often times report feeling particularly worried about seeking help because no one would believe them and they'll feel like somehow they're less of a man or someone else will say that," Messinger said.

But IPV is not only physical—it also includes psychological, emotional and even "identity" violence, Messinger said.

"For instance, a substantial amount of research has shown that people who are not yet out of the closet about their sexual orientation or their trans* identity to everyone in their lives—and frankly most people aren't out to everyone—leaves them vulnerable to abusers who might use that as leverage to say, 'if you tell anyone about what I'm doing to you or if you leave me, I can out you to your parents, your siblings, to your employer, your friends,'" Messinger said.

Conversely, abusers sometimes pressure victims to remain closeted, especially if the abuser is not out to everyone in their life.

Furthermore, many U.S. states lack anti-discrimination laws protecting LGBTQ people in housing, employment and public accommodation. And barriers for transgender people being able to change their names and gender listed on formal identification "has a ripple effect throughout their lives," Messinger said.

In some states, if one were to pursue a protective order or engage in a civil suit under domestic violence statues, "it's quite possible that that state might require your name and identity to become public."

"That really creates a lot of barriers to being able to ask for help and not have to out yourself at the same time," Messinger said.

"The law is not on the side of LGBTQ people who experience intimate partner violence," making it more difficult for victims to receive help.

Messinger pointed to other myths that make LGBTQ IPV unique: that it should not be discussed out of fear of undermining LBGTQ struggles for equality and that LGBTQ IPV abusers are masculine.

Messinger said he hopes his book draws attention to the issue of LGBTQ IPV "when there is so little in terms of resources and policy being oriented towards this issue." And with all the challenges and unique traits of LGBTQ IPV, customized resources and support are necessary, he said.

He wrote the book as a sort of how-to guide with practical tips and a broad audience in mind—law enforcement, mental and medical health providers, social workers, domestic violence hotline operators, domestic violence shelter staff, policymakers, victims, allies and advocates.

What's next

Messinger reviewed scores of literature published in English, but he said he'd like to see further research in other languages, at a time when same-gender marriage is fully legal in about 22 nations and 15 countries permit joint adoption by same-gender couples.

There is also a lack of research on how LGBTQ IPV intersects with the criminal justice system, he said.

Police are 10 to 30 times more likely to arrest both partners in cases of violence between same-gender partners than different-gender partners, Messinger writes.

"It sends the wrong message to the victim that somehow if they seek help, they're the ones who are going to suffer for it," Messinger said.

"Often times that makes it harder for victims to receive services because they're labeled an abuser, making it difficult to get into a shelter," he said.

Messinger is also part of a research team conducting longitudinal research of IPV among youths to see how patterns of abuse change over time.

LGBTQ Intimate Partner Violence: Lessons for Policy, Practice, and Research is published by the University of California Press, and is available in hardcover and e-book through Amazon and Barnes and Noble.


This article shared 1231 times since Wed Mar 29, 2017
facebook twitter pin it google +1 reddit email





Windy City Media Group does not approve or necessarily agree with the views posted below.
Please do not post letters to the editor here. Please also be civil in your dialogue.
If you need to be mean, just know that the longer you stay on this page, the more you help us.


  ARTICLES YOU MIGHT LIKE

Gay News

WORLD Germany's compensation, Lyra McKee, LGBTQ Afghans, tennis player
2021-09-19
Germany has compensated almost 250 people who were prosecuted or investigated under a Nazi-era law criminalizing homosexuality, according to euronews. By September, 317 people had applied for compensation for their ...


Gay News

Hastert settles sexual-abuse lawsuit
2021-09-16
Days before a trial was set to begin, former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert reached a tentative settlement in a hush-money lawsuit filed by a man whose decades-old sexual-abuse allegations led to the politician's downfall six ...


Gay News

Gov. Pritzker signs transformative energy legislation for Illinois
2021-09-15
--From a press release - CHICAGO — Delivering on principles previously laid out, Governor JB Pritzker signed landmark legislation into law that puts the state on a path toward 100% clean energy, invests in training a diverse workforce for the jobs ...


Gay News

Catholic theologians urge protections for LGBTQ+ people
2021-09-14
More than 750 of the nation's leading Catholic theologians, church leaders, scholars, educators and writers have joined New Ways Ministry in voicing support for nondiscrimination protections for LGBTQ people, according to a New Ways press release. ...


Gay News

Men Having Babies surrogacy conference on Oct. 9
2021-09-13
The Men Having Babies 2021 Midwest Surrogacy Conference & Expo will take place Saturday, Oct. 9, 9 a.m.-7 p.m., at Center on Halsted, 3656 N. Halsted St. According to a press statement, more than 100 (vaccinated!) ...


Gay News

NATIONAL Teachers, GLAAD talks HRC, 9/11 items, Dr. Rachel Levine
2021-09-12
In North Carolina, a former teacher won a lawsuit against Charlotte Catholic High School and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charlotte after he lost his job following an announcement on Facebook that he planned to marry ...


Gay News

WORLD False report, Indian activist dies, fashion exhibit, LGBT Awards
2021-09-12
In Spain, a man who claimed eight hooded men carved an anti-gay slur on his butt using a knife in a horrific hate crime later said the act was consensual, according to out.com. According to police ...


Gay News

Women & Children First hosting virtual event with Anita Hill on Sept. 29
2021-09-11
Anita Hill—the University Professor of Social Policy, Law, and Women's and Gender Studies at Brandeis University who played a major role in the 1991 Senate confirmation hearings for U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas—will be part ...


Gay News

Chicago neighborhood nonprofits join forces to provide free attorneys
2021-09-07
Four Chicago neighborhood nonprofits—LCLC (Lawndale Christian Legal Center), Breakthrough, BUILD (Broader Urban Involvement & Leadership Development) and New Life Centers—have formed a partnership to assign free ...


Gay News

One in ten LGBT workers experienced discrimination at work in the last year
2021-09-07
LGBT employees of color were more likely to report being denied jobs and verbal harassment A new study by the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law finds an estimated 46% of LGBT workers have experienced ...


Gay News

Constand breaks silence about Bill Cosby
2021-09-07
Bill Cosby accuser Andrea Constand is breaking her silence to NBC News about the comic/actor's release from prison two months ago, Deadline noted. In a brief clip, Constand tells Kate Snow she "was really shocked — ...


Gay News

Afghan LGBTQs in peril, with little help in sight
2021-09-06
Hundreds, perhaps thousands, of LGBT Afghan citizens, who dared to take modest steps toward living openly when their country was under the occupation and influence of a more tolerant "western culture," are now literally hiding in ...


Gay News

NATIONAL Calif. bill, lawsuits, Billy Porter, 'Southern LGBTQ Experiences'
2021-09-05
The California legislature okayed a bill that would launch a pilot program to better track the gender identity and sexual orientation of victims of fatal violence, Gay City News noted. Under AB 1094, or the Sexual ...


Gay News

WORLD Anti-TGNC vote, #VeryGayRaptor, Brazilian governor, Scottish poll
2021-09-05
In Australia, the government voted down workplace protections for transgender, non-binary and intersex people, OutInPerth.com reported. The senate was considering the Sex Discrimination and Fair Work (Respect at Work) Amendment ...


Gay News

Pappas reintroduces expanded SERVE Act to guarantee LGBTQ+ veterans VA benefits
2021-09-04
--From a press release - Washington, D.C. - Today, Congressman Chris Pappas (NH-01), member of the House Veterans Affairs Committee and Co-Chair of the Equality Caucus, alongside Reps. Mike Levin (CA-49), Kathleen M. Rice (NY-04) ...


 



Copyright © 2021 Windy City Media Group. All rights reserved.
Reprint by permission only. PDFs for back issues are downloadable from
our online archives. Single copies of back issues in print form are
available for $4 per issue, older than one month for $6 if available,
by check to the mailing address listed below.

Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, drawings, and
photographs submitted if they are to be returned, and no
responsibility may be assumed for unsolicited materials.
All rights to letters, art and photos sent to Nightspots
(Chicago GLBT Nightlife News) and Windy City Times (a Chicago
Gay and Lesbian News and Feature Publication) will be treated
as unconditionally assigned for publication purposes and as such,
subject to editing and comment. The opinions expressed by the
columnists, cartoonists, letter writers, and commentators are
their own and do not necessarily reflect the position of Nightspots
(Chicago GLBT Nightlife News) and Windy City Times (a Chicago Gay,
Lesbian, Bisexual and Transegender News and Feature Publication).

The appearance of a name, image or photo of a person or group in
Nightspots (Chicago GLBT Nightlife News) and Windy City Times
(a Chicago Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender News and Feature
Publication) does not indicate the sexual orientation of such
individuals or groups. While we encourage readers to support the
advertisers who make this newspaper possible, Nightspots (Chicago
GLBT Nightlife News) and Windy City Times (a Chicago Gay, Lesbian
News and Feature Publication) cannot accept responsibility for
any advertising claims or promotions.

 

 

 

TRENDINGBREAKINGPHOTOS







Sponsor
Sponsor


 



Donate


About WCMG      Contact Us      Online Front  Page      Windy City  Times      Nightspots      OUT! Guide     
Identity      BLACKlines      En La Vida      Archives      Advanced Search     
Windy City Queercast      Queercast Archives     
Press  Releases      Join WCMG  Email List      Email Blast      Blogs     
Upcoming Events      Todays Events      Ongoing Events      Bar Guide      Community Groups      In Memoriam      Outguide Categories      Outguide Advertisers      Search Outguide      Travel      Dining Out      Privacy Policy     

Windy City Media Group publishes Windy City Times,
The Bi-Weekly Voice of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Trans Community.
5315 N. Clark St. #192, Chicago, IL 60640-2113 • PH (773) 871-7610 • FAX (773) 871-7609.